Home Island Presentation 13th September 2017
Main Menu
Home
Who are we
Geographical situation
Offered services
Island Presentation
Pictures
Links
Contact Us
Others Contacts
Thanks
Island Presentation

 -

Langlade

“This english translated version is made available for those who cannot read French. Translating from your own language into a foreign language is not an easy task, the translator is quite aware of its limitation and will welcome any suggestions. Thanks.”

One interesting feature of our islands is the diversity of its landscape. The Cape of Miquelon for the most part made of metamorphic rocks has steep cliffs on its Northern and Eastern side. The main island of Miquelon, volcanic in origin has low and accessible coasts all around it. Langlade is different with its plateau indicating a sedimentary origin.
Langlade is only 25 km away from the villageof Miquelon. You can reach it by the road that follows the west coast of Miquelon, then drive or walk alongside the salt lagoon of Grand Barachois and the rest of the Isthmus.
From l’Anse du Gouvernement (Government cove) you can go up the “Belle Rivière valley” one of the most important river of the islands or go up “Tête Pelée” then go down to “l’Anse aux Soldats” (Soldier cove). 


This area of Langlade is usually sunnier than the rest of the island. This is why in the past Capelin was dried there. This little fish come and spawn on the shores in the month of June.

 If you have some energy left, you can go on to “l’Anse à Ross” (Ross cove). If you know the island enough or with a map and compass you can reach the upper valley or “Belle Rivière” and down back to Government cove.

Most of Langlade’s coasts are steep and really picturesques and could be visited from St. Pierre by boat. There you could see black guillemots, razorbills, black-legged Kittiwakes and at least two nests of bald eagle.



Ruins of Couillette’s farm, South-western coast of Langlade

The walk to the “Pointe-Plate” lighthouse (lit as the one in Miquelon on July 15, 1883) is interesting. It will have even more interest if you decide to come back by another path and visiting the site of and old farm called “Couillette”. There you’ll be walking along grassy slopes with usually several grey and harbour seals at the bottom.



The Pointe-Plate Lighthouse, on south-western Langlade. Photo Alain Orsiny

The “Dolisie” Valley is quite nice with beautiful grassy slopes. The brook there come from the middle of the island of Langlade.
A stroll up the “Cap Bleu” (blue cape) will bring you to a kind of arctic landscape. Seen from the sea the cliffs there show quite spectacular vertical strata.
The valley of “Deuxième Maquine” is in fact a quite remarkable. little canyon.
The “Anse des Voiles Blanches (White sails cove) got its name from the vertical cliffs in the area that appear as white sails as seen from St. Pierre.


It is at Langlade that the Red-throated Loon reaches it breeding southern limit in North America.

The dominant habitat is once again the peat bog where you can find the “Cloudberry” or “Bakeapple” as it is called in Newfoundland, which is a delicacy for the local population, as well as numerous other species like the carnivorous pitcher plant, the bladderwort and most of our 21 species of orchids.

“This english translated version is made available for those who cannot read French. Translating from your own language into a foreign language is not an easy task, the translator is quite aware of its limitation and will welcome any suggestions. Thanks.”

One interesting feature of our islands is the diversity of its landscape. The Cape of Miquelon for the most part made of metamorphic rocks has steep cliffs on its Northern and Eastern side. The main island of Miquelon, volcanic in origin has low and accessible coasts all around it. Langlade is different with its plateau indicating a sedimentary origin.
Langlade is only 25 km away from the villageof Miquelon. You can reach it by the road that follows the west coast of Miquelon, then drive or walk alongside the salt lagoon of Grand Barachois and the rest of the Isthmus.
From l’Anse du Gouvernement (Government cove) you can go up the “Belle Rivière valley” one of the most important river of the islands or go up “Tête Pelée” then go down to “l’Anse aux Soldats” (Soldier cove). 


This area of Langlade is usually sunnier than the rest of the island. This is why in the past Capelin was dried there. This little fish come and spawn on the shores in the month of June.

 If you have some energy left, you can go on to “l’Anse à Ross” (Ross cove). If you know the island enough or with a map and compass you can reach the upper valley or “Belle Rivière” and down back to Government cove.

Most of Langlade’s coasts are steep and really picturesques and could be visited from St. Pierre by boat. There you could see black guillemots, razorbills, black-legged Kittiwakes and at least two nests of bald eagle.



Ruins of Couillette’s farm, South-western coast of Langlade

The walk to the “Pointe-Plate” lighthouse (lit as the one in Miquelon on July 15, 1883) is interesting. It will have even more interest if you decide to come back by another path and visiting the site of and old farm called “Couillette”. There you’ll be walking along grassy slopes with usually several grey and harbour seals at the bottom.



The Pointe-Plate Lighthouse, on south-western Langlade. Photo Alain Orsiny

The “Dolisie” Valley is quite nice with beautiful grassy slopes. The brook there come from the middle of the island of Langlade.
A stroll up the “Cap Bleu” (blue cape) will bring you to a kind of arctic landscape. Seen from the sea the cliffs there show quite spectacular vertical strata.
The valley of “Deuxième Maquine” is in fact a quite remarkable. little canyon.
The “Anse des Voiles Blanches (White sails cove) got its name from the vertical cliffs in the area that appear as white sails as seen from St. Pierre.


It is at Langlade that the Red-throated Loon reaches it breeding southern limit in North America.

The dominant habitat is once again the peat bog where you can find the “Cloudberry” or “Bakeapple” as it is called in Newfoundland, which is a delicacy for the local population, as well as numerous other species like the carnivorous pitcher plant, the bladderwort and most of our 21 species of orchids.

 





up    Go to Top    up